What causes AI boom and bust: a personal view of Artificial Intelligence history

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is ubiquitous. Everything from toiletries to phones to cow tracking claims to be using ‘cutting edge AI technology’ to improve the efficiency, usefulness or accuracy of specific products or services.

But the cutting edge might not be as sharp as many believe. AI has a nearly 70-year long history with some surprising backtracks and re-emergences among it...

A new way of thinking about media forensics

Artificial Intelligence (AI) approaches are increasingly used to create or edit media ... The capabilities of these tools mean it’s harder than ever to spot a fake image, or a fake sound recording or a fake video – and that’s a problem for many organisations. What’s needed is a radical rethink, by those who care, of the way that trust in media content can be evaluated, that draws on well-established protocols and analogous problems. Rather than try to spot a fake by looking more closely at its content (for instance, the edges of visual elements, composition, relationships between pixels in an image, or the attributes of the file such as file size or compression) etc, one must instead look more closely at its context. There are multiple ways this might be done. The military have long been specialists at deception (think camouflage) and the assessment of information of variable trustworthiness...

Societal aspects of Artificial Intelligence

A societal approach, based on fairness and transparency, needs to be adopted when developing and introducing Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, according to Kiki de Bruijn, a cognitive neuroscientist working at Diffblue as an Artificial Intelligence Evangelist, who took part in the AI Expo held in London Olympia on 18 and 19 April 2018. De Bruijn declared herself a firm believer in AI’s potential to improve the way people live. She insisted that, in order to achieve ...

Should intelligent decision-making be handed over to Artificial Intelligence?

As more enterprises around the world start investing in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its subsets Machine and Deep Learning, Image and Voice Recognition, Artificial Neural Networks, etc, scientific and business leaders have an interesting question to answer. Should AI be used solely to ease navigation through big data and augment human capabilities, or should it be allowed a more independent role in intelligent decision-making? Before getting AI fully involved in that sophisticated process, a few other important points need to be addressed...

Could AI help spot a fake Donald Trump?

Spotting a fake image of Donald TrumpOne of the major use cases for AI is object recognition for machine vision and other applications. The number of uses to which object recognition can be put is huge: think of how much of human life is based on the ability to identify what we see – both ‘in the flesh’, and in reproductions such as photographs, paintings, drawings and videos.

Some images are designed to be symbolic: signage uses representations that abstract the essential attributes of a thing in a way that can be easily interpreted by a human. Sometimes the abstraction and final representations draw on more than data that is just pictorial, but could be cultural too. For instance, identifying ladies’ and gents’ toilets from their signs assumes the viewer understands the cultural significance of the A-line skirt. At an even higher level of abstraction...

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