Telecom industry looks at how to slice up 5G networks

Slicing breadA self-driving car and a device that sends occasional updates on the humidity levels of a golfing green don't need the same levels of latency and performance from a network. 5G design will mean a network will no longer have to cater for both. Instead network slicing, which is a key feature of 5G, lets operators automatically create separate, virtual end-to-end networks over the same physical infrastructure...

Five challenges to commercializing wearable and ingestible medical sensors

Wearable and ingestible sensor technologies are rapidly emerging and could shake up the medical industry. They transmit information on vital signs, like heart rate and blood pressure, to a device such as a smartphone, and can be used to monitor those with long-term health conditions ... but there are multiple obstacles to be overcome before these technologies are commercialized...

How healthy is energy harvesting in the medical field, and what’s the prognosis?

The only certain thing in electronics is that active devices need power; the rest is optional. There are several ways to provide power. For small devices, the most common currently is batteries, and they require changing or recharging ... But for the growing field of implantable medical devices such as pacemakers, battery replacement involves an invasive surgical procedure risking internal bleeding, inflammation and infection, all of which would be unnecessary if the promise of energy harvesting is realised...

There are a number of options to power medical devices through harvesting ambient energy sources in the human body such as heat, movement, or pressure.  Various research studies that we describe later show that the power that can be gleaned from energy harvesting devices is in the nanowatt to microwatt range, which would be enough to power a device. An increasing number of studies and experiments seem to confirm that energy harvesting can be a solution to provide that needed power.

Joseph’s technocapable coat: energy harvesting for smart clothes

Smart clothes are the territory where style and science are destined to meet. Their rendezvous is already taking place, giving garments a whole host of innovative applications, such as charging depots for personal electronic gadgets, fitness trackers for capturing biometric data and colour-changing fashionable assets that go with everything. After a slow start technology-laden clothing is now available. Practical energy harvesting would drive development faster: there are clear practical problems with plugging clothes in to charge – not least because washing and electricity generally don’t go well together.

Lidar for riders on the autonomous car storm: Lidar and computer vision systems from 1995 to today

The story starts in 1995. A silver Mercedes Benz S-Class W140 drags past more conservative drivers on the German Autobahn at 110 miles per hour (180km/h). It might sound like nothing out of the ordinary. Except this car had a cool name: VaMP. And it was autonomous ...

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