Innovation Observatory

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Innovation Observatory researches, analyses and interprets fast-moving technology markets to help our clients:
  • identify great product or service investment opportunities
  • avoid wasting time and money on the wrong products, services or markets
  • change their competitive positioning and strategies
  • find new customers
  • create compelling marketing and sales messages and materials that resonate with their target audience.

We combine best-in-class research, analysis and consulting techniques with deep sector knowledge and a track record of demonstrating how technology markets evolve. We are currently working in the telecoms, IT, media, health and environmental technology sectors.

Securing the Industrial IoT: What's going on?

Today's industrial technology settings have more interfaces than ever before, making industrial systems some of the most attractive targets for malware and ransomware attacks. Most of the top industrial IoT (IIoT) security concerns relate to this increasing openness – and the slow pace of industry’s response to it.

Telecom industry looks at how to slice up 5G networks

Slicing breadA self-driving car and a device that sends occasional updates on the humidity levels of a golfing green don't need the same levels of latency and performance from a network. 5G design will mean a network will no longer have to cater for both. Instead network slicing, which is a key feature of 5G, lets operators automatically create separate, virtual end-to-end networks over the same physical infrastructure...

Five challenges to commercializing wearable and ingestible medical sensors

Wearable and ingestible sensor technologies are rapidly emerging and could shake up the medical industry. They transmit information on vital signs, like heart rate and blood pressure, to a device such as a smartphone, and can be used to monitor those with long-term health conditions ... but there are multiple obstacles to be overcome before these technologies are commercialized...

How healthy is energy harvesting in the medical field, and what’s the prognosis?

The only certain thing in electronics is that active devices need power; the rest is optional. There are several ways to provide power. For small devices, the most common currently is batteries, and they require changing or recharging ... But for the growing field of implantable medical devices such as pacemakers, battery replacement involves an invasive surgical procedure risking internal bleeding, inflammation and infection, all of which would be unnecessary if the promise of energy harvesting is realised...

There are a number of options to power medical devices through harvesting ambient energy sources in the human body such as heat, movement, or pressure.  Various research studies that we describe later show that the power that can be gleaned from energy harvesting devices is in the nanowatt to microwatt range, which would be enough to power a device. An increasing number of studies and experiments seem to confirm that energy harvesting can be a solution to provide that needed power.

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